Fantastic New Article By Suzanne Church on SF Signal… How to Justify Your Horror Obsession!

http://www.sfsignal.com/archives/2014/04/guest-post-suzanne-church-on-10-ways-to-keep-your-sff-loving-boyfriend-happy-while-enjoying-your-horror-fix/

I can totally relate to this article. Sometimes it’s hard to justify your love of horror to fan friends that enjoy lighter fare, and I love Suzanne Church’s humorous take on it.

It reminds me just how lucky I am to have a zombie nut at home. ❤ His office even comes complete with a wall o’ skulls.

Feel the spoopy...

Feel the spoopy…

 

Yup, we’re just a couple of work-a-day professional eccentrics.

In fact, I think that he is definitely the more hard-core horror fan of the two of us, which is tough, because there’s always a little bit of a dark twist to everything I do. But he’s a wily one… and I think he may have used some of these tactics to get me into more horror, especially the one about offering up stuff with more fantasy elements to it. Before being with Robin, I hadn’t experienced how wonderful fantasy/horror hybrids could be… I thought it was all vampires and werewolves, which although I know a lot of people enjoy that kind of dark/urban fantasy, just isn’t my favorite. I think you either love it or you don’t. It’s funny how the people you meet influence your work sometimes…

How about you, out there in blog land? Has anyone come into your life and shown you things that changed the way you think about your art?

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Hanging Out At Historic Ferguson Station This Summer

Are you local to Hamilton and looking for something fun to do on a Sunday afternoon? Then come out and join Pop Seagull Publishing, and a whole bunch of other unique local vendors at the Village Station Bazaar! So far, the line-up is sounding really good, with new and used books, vintage clothing, crafts and antiques.

I think this is going to be a cool event, for a lot of reasons. For one thing, it’s conveniently located in the downtown core, off King Street East, so I think it’s going to be accessible to a lot of people who don’t normally get out to more formal events. For another, it’s going to be held in Ferguson Station, which is a beautiful example of the 19th-century reclamations which Hamilton is known for. Once a bustling railway station on the Grand Trunk Railway line running from Toronto to Montreal, it has now been converted into a beautiful, vaulted open air market. Another fun item of note is that Ferguson Station was the home of the Hamilton Mustard Festival from 1998 to 2010.

So, clearly if you’re looking for a quirky, fun, open air venue featuring unique wares (and you know I always am) the Village Station Bazaar is for you! We’ll be there on:

May 4th

June 1st

July 6

August 3

Cute, right? (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

See you there!

And now for one of the great ideas of history…

Yesterday, while driving home from work, I watched someone tailgate a mini truck with a full septic tank and porta-john hanging off its back, supported only by a couple of lengths of canvas strapping.  I wish I was making this up.

Driving has provided so much additional entertainment to my day. If only rearview mirrors were equipped with cameras. 🙂

Some Thoughts On Ad Astra 2014

This weekend, I attended Ad Astra 2014, an annual literary SF/F/H convention held in Toronto. Ad Astra was the first convention I ever attended as a young person (to the best of my admittedly shoddy memory, I was around 17) and it has always been a lot of fun and a great learning experience.

Ad Astra is where I first started to connect with the indie writing community, and picked up some of the first books that were outside of the mainstream, feature shelf at Chapters Indigo category. It’s actually where I wrote my first published short story as part of a flash fiction contest. Before that point, I had scarcely ever written any flash fiction. The mental stretch of trying a new form among friends, I believe, helped to push me to that next level and make every word count in a way that finally caught the attention of an editor.

Ad Astra was also one of the first places that I learned about the ins and outs, the opportunities and pitfalls of self and indie publishing. I was intrigued that so many people were out there, doing it for themselves, and not waiting for someone else to tell them it was okay to begin. I met people who were producing high quality work that didn’t fall into easy categories, and I loved it. Yes, over the years, Ad Astra has provided a fertile ground for the seeds of my creativity and business sense to grow in.

These past few years have not been easy for me. A lot of the initial inspiration, strength and conviction I found through my passion for writing and art have been shaken by the perspiration that it takes to get somewhere with your work. I’ve faced severe financial hardship, job uncertainty, hostile work environments, and drifting away from friends. For several years, I also faced self-alienation from the fan community after a horrible experience with a stalker that went unaddressed and left me feeling vulnerable and unsupported within the community. All of these things have led me to question my work, my conviction, and my reasons for doing what I do.

Things reached a low for me this past fall when I was forced to drain most of my funds for upcoming cons and business appearances in order to pay rent, because a contract I had been promised fell through at the last minute. The business was left with a skeleton budget, barely limping along and unable to grow until such time as I found the money to breathe new life into it. With credit card debt mounting, and a job that paid a fraction of what I would have gotten with the other contract, I felt hopeless and bogged down with obligations.

A few months went by, and I tried to figure out what to do, but nothing I came up which seemed realistic. I got a car, got out of debt, and generally stabilized things, but I was still feeling discouraged artistically, and a little bit lost trying to manage my art time with a full time job. That was when I got an amazing email, one that I’d forgotten was coming. Ad Astra was writing me to confirm my place in the dealers’ room, which I’d booked two years before but hadn’t been able to follow up on. Since I now had a car, I could keep costs low, and potentially fund some future projects, if the weekend went well.

Suffice it to say, the weekend went well. We sold out of our second anthology, Spirits of Suburbia, and had to direct more people to our e-store. We made enough money for more books, more appearances, more everything, and better than that… I got inspired again. I learned about some amazing opportunities for marketing my books nearby that didn’t involve table fees or gas money. I looked into some really great volunteer opportunities that I hope will bring me closer to the local writing community. I got two (two!) interviews! There’s way more to tell on that front, but hopefully that can all wait until I have official announcements to make. I also received praise for our books from several writing colleagues whom I greatly respect, which… well, I just have to say thank you to everyone who offered words of encouragement. You have no idea how much your support and friendship meant at this point in time, and continues to mean going forward.

Ad Astra has done it again. I came in tired, discouraged and on my last legs, and I left inspired, supported, and empowered for the battle ahead. Thank you to everyone involved with the convention, and I wish long life and health to this wonderful organization. Thank you for making grass-roots arts and literature possible for the fan community with integrity and inclusiveness.

Ad Astra Interview! (Volume One)

This weekend, I got a chance to sell some books with my publishing company, Pop Seagull Publishing, recharge with other like-minded peeps, and even do a couple of interviews. Here’s the first of two, for http://www.youtube.com/YAwordnerds. Looks like they’ve got a really good thing going over there, so check ’em out!